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Gary Hoffman

Gary HoffmanGary Hoffman combines instrumental mastery, great beauty of sound, and a poetic sensibility in his distinctive and memorable performances. Hoffman achieved international renown following his victory as the first American to win the Rostropovich International Cello Competition in Paris in 1986. He has appeared as soloist with the world’s leading orchestras, including those of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia, London, Montréal, Toronto, and San Francisco, collaborating with such celebrated conductors as André Previn, Charles Dutoit, James Levine, Kent Nagano, Mstislav Rostropovich, Sir Andrew Davis, and Herbert Blomstedt.

Mr. Hoffman’s recent highlights include multiple performances and tours with Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. He has appeared at Chamber Music Northwest in Portland, Oregon, with the Greensboro Symphony playing the Beethoven Triple Concerto, and at Caramoor as a Distinguished Artist. In summer 2007, Gary Hoffman returned to the Ravinia Festival, giving an all-Beethoven recital with pianist André-Michel Schub, and taught again at the Steans Institute. Other U.S. engagements have included a performance of Shostakovich Cello Concerto No. 1 with Madison Symphony, a solo Bach recital at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Theatre, and Elgar’s Cello Concerto with Jorge Mester and the Naples Philharmonic.

He is a frequent guest of string quartets including the Emerson, Tokyo, Borromeo, Brentano, and Ysaye quartets and is an artist member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. He appears each season with this esteemed ensemble. Other collaborations have included his duo recital performances with pianist Philippe Bianconi, programs of the Beethoven piano/cello sonatas with pianist André-Michel Schub at the Virginia Beach Festival and La Jolla Chamber Music Society, and performances of Brahms quartets with pianist Leon Fleisher and violinists Cho-Liang Lin and Daniel Phillips.

Mr. Hoffman has toured with the Orchestra of Kronberg, Germany, and with the Monte Carlo Philharmonic in the French premiere of Elliot Carter’s cello concerto. He has performed with the Orchestre National de France, Orchestre de Marseilles, the Tapiola Sinfonietta in Sweden, Chamber Orchestra of Israel, Orchestre de Monte-Carlo, the Nederlands Filharmonisch Orkest, the Russian National Orchestra, the orchestras of Turkey and Lahti (Finland), the Paris Ensemble Orchestra under John Nelson, Orchestre de Cannes, Montpellier Symphony, and the Oviedo Symphony in Spain, among others. In recital, Mr. Hoffman has appeared at Alice Tully Hall in New York, Suntory Hall in Tokyo, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Théâtre du Châtelet, Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, Teatro Pergola in Florence, the Tivoli in Copenhagen, the Gulbenkian in Lisbon, the St. Lawrence Center in Toronto, and McGill University in Montreal.

At the Ravinia Festival, Mr. Hoffman has performed a solo Bach recital and Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Other festival appearances have included Haydn’s C Major Cello Concerto with Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Festival, and Brahms’ Double Concerto with Joshua Bell and the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Charles Dutoit at Saratoga Performing Arts Center. He has been a guest at Aspen, Bath, Marlboro, Mstislav Rostropovich’s International Music Festival of Evian in France, the Casals Festival in Prades, Helsinki, Mostly Mozart, Santa Fe, Schleswig-Holstein, Verbier and others.

Gary Hoffman was born in Vancouver, Canada, in 1956. At 15 he made his London recital debut in Wigmore Hall. His New York recital debut occurred in 1979. At the age of 22 he became the youngest faculty appointee in the history of the Indiana University School of Music, where he remained for eight years. Mr. Hoffman, who is frequently invited to hold master classes, has coached cellists at numerous institutions and festivals. Gary Hoffman has recorded for BMG (RCA), Sony, EMI and Le Chant du Monde. He resides in Paris. He plays the 1662 Nicolo Amati cello formerly owned by Leonard Rose.